Versailles – Hall of Mirrors

Versailles Hall of Mirrors

In the heart of the Palace of Versailles – itself one of the grandest buildings ever built by man – is a room which captures the awe of all who see it. The Hall of Mirrors is the symbol of the great French palace, a long and bright room which welcomes in the sun from one side, disperses it to all corners from another, and holds the twinkling light of magnificent chandeliers from its ceiling.

The Hall of Mirrors is the central gallery of the Palace of Versailles and is renowned as being one of the most famous rooms in the world. 

Versailles – Hall of Mirrors

The principal feature of this famous hall is the seventeen mirror-clad arches that reflect the seventeen arched windows that overlook the gardens. Each arch contains twenty-one mirrors with a total complement of 357 used in the decoration of the Gallerie des Glaces (Hall of Mirrors). The arches themselves are fixed between marble pilasters whose capitals depict the symbol of France. The several glass chandeliers that hang from its ceiling are another beautiful aspect of the hall. On special occasions, the Hall of Mirrors was lit with as many as 20,000 candles to transform it into a “corridor of light”.

The Hall of Mirrors is the symbol of the great French palace, a long and bright room, which welcomes in the sun from one side, disperses it to all corners from another, and holds the twinkling light of magnificent chandeliers from its ceiling.

The whole length of the Hall of Mirrors (73m) pays tribute to the political, economic and artistic success of France. Courtiers and visitors crossed the Hall of Mirrors daily, and it also served as a place for waiting and meeting. It was used for ceremonies on rare occasions, for entertainment (balls or games) held for royal weddings or diplomatic receptions. It was also here that the Treaty of Versailles was signed on 28 June 1919, ending the First World War. Since then, presidents of the Republic have continued to receive official guests here.

Versailles Hall of Mirrors

The Hall of Mirrors is the symbol of the great French palace, a long and bright room, which welcomes in the sun from one side, disperses it to all corners from another, and holds the twinkling light of magnificent chandeliers from its ceiling.

Versailles Private Tours Hall of Mirrors

The whole length of the Hall of Mirrors (73m) pays tribute to the political, economic and artistic success of France. Courtiers and visitors crossed the Hall of Mirrors daily, and it also served as a place for waiting and meeting. It was used for ceremonies on rare occasions, for entertainment (balls or games) held for royal weddings or diplomatic receptions. It was also here that the Treaty of Versailles was signed on 28 June 1919, ending the First World War. Since then, presidents of the Republic have continued to receive official guests here.