The Great Exhibitions not to be Missed in 2020 in Paris

When you want to visit an exhibition in Paris, the most difficult thing is to make a choice. From the Museo d’Orsay to the Louvre, from the Centre Pompidou to the Grand Palais.

“Leonardo da Vinci” at the Louvre Museum

From October 24, 2019 to February 24, 2020, the Louvre Museum shows a great retrospective dedicated to Leonardo da Vinci on the occasion of the 500th anniversary of his death. An opportunity to get acquainted with a rare collection of paintings and graphics of the Italian master, both from the funds of the Louvre Museum itself, and others provided from different sources on this special occasion.

Pierre Soulage’s retrospective at the Louvre Museum in Paris

From 11 December 2019 to 9 March 2020, the Louvre organizes an exhibition by Pierre Soulage. The master of black, also known as the inventor of ultramarine, creates light, contrasting between black and white. “There are differences in textures: smooth, fibrous, calm, tense, which, capturing or refusing light, born gray-black or deep black,” the artist says.

Works received by Jacques Chirac's Branly Museum for the last 20 years

From September 24, 2019 to January 26, 2020. How do museums acquire their collections? Why do they increase their funds, and how do they choose new exhibits for their collections? On the occasion of its 20th anniversary, the Museum on the Branly embankment invites the audience to look into its behind-the-scenes, tells the inner life of museums and the importance of open display of art works to preserve France’s cultural heritage. This exhibition will be the embodiment of everything new; it affirms the viability of collections and their constant change.

Exhibition "El Greco. Retrospective" at the Grand Palais

From October 14, 2019 to February 10, 2020, A retrospective exhibition dedicated to the unusual work of Domenikos Teotokopoulos, nicknamed “El Greco”, is taking place in the Grand Palais. Premiere in France!

Exhibition "Revival of Versailles 1867-1937" at the Palace of Versailles

From November 19-March 15 to 2020. Here is a retrospective, which once again emphasizes the significance of this place of concentration of state power, where different aristocrats and great artists lived for centuries, for example, Marcel Proust. Versailles is a place of celebration, attended by such historical figures as Empress Eugenie, a big fan of Marie Antoinette, or the queen Victoria who visited here in 1855. In addition, the palace managed to influence an entire picturesque school – a historical school, with scenes fully reproduced in an elevated style. These paintings are presented in the framework of the exhibition “The Renaissance of Versailles 1867-1937.”

"Artist's Image" at the Louvre Museum

From September 25, 2019 to June 29, 2020. The Small Gallery holds an exhibition “The Artist’s Image” which is included in the cycle dedicated to great names in Renaissance art, particularly da Vinci, Donatello and Michelangelo. Like a signature or a self-portrait, the continued use of images of artists appears in history as a form of appreciation and confirmation of the significance of their work.

"Gesture Factory - Hans Hartung" at the Paris Museum of Modern Art

From October 11, 2019 to March 1, 2020. An Exhibition at the center of the experiment, in which the main driving force of any artist’s creativity is a penchant for risk and adventure. Who can serve as a better embodiment of this freedom of creativity than Hans Hartung, the forerunner of abstract art, who for a long time stayed aloof from cubism and surrealism. A retrospective, consisting of three hundred works, will allow you to get acquainted with the Hartung’s method, which is distinguished by the desire to study authenticity, cropping, photography, enlargement, repetition and accurate reproduction of many works.

James Tissot (1836-1902) at the Museo d'Orsay

From October 11, 2019 to March 1, 2020. An Exhibition at the center of the experiment, in which the main driving force of any artist’s creativity is a penchant for risk and adventure. Who can serve as a better embodiment of this freedom of creativity than Hans Hartung, the forerunner of abstract art, who for a long time stayed aloof from cubism and surrealism. A retrospective, consisting of three hundred works, will allow you to get acquainted with the Hartung’s method, which is distinguished by the desire to study authenticity, cropping, photography, enlargement, repetition and accurate reproduction of many works.

"I eat, therefore, I exist" in the Museum of Man

From October 16, 2019 to June 1, 2020. Tell me what you eat and I will tell you who you are. This is the answer the Museum of Man seeks to give to its viewer by presenting him with an exhibition dedicated to food. A retrospective focuses on a person’s fundamental need that passes through times and cultures and is determined by beliefs, ethics or climate. Thus, food is considered in a social, cultural and historical context. Do foods have a genus? Why are some of them banned? What about the production and consumption of those foods that are now considered harmful to health and our planet? All of these issues are considered from an interdisciplinary point of view, reflecting public debate and changes that have occurred in our eating habits.

"On Love" at the Palace of Discovery

From October 8, 2019 to August 30, 2020. From Love in art to love on the Internet – in the Palace of Discovery this feeling is considered both emotionally and scientifically in an attempt to at least slightly open the veil of mystery. Paying tribute to Roland Barth, the curators of the exhibition present scientific dogma through poems, semantic fields, various objects and situations. There is something to please pastoral lovers.

"The New World of Charlotte Peryan 1903-1999" at the Louis Vuitton Foundation

From October 2, 2019 to February 24, 2020. For fans of design and sculpture – an exhibition in the halls of the Louis Vuitton Foundation on the occasion of the 20th anniversary of the passing of Charlotte Peryan, one of the greatest artists of the 20th century. Although much less was spoken about her than about Le Corbusier, in fact it was she, who made revolutionary changes in the use of space, creating open kitchens and a loft style in 1930. Having studied national architectural traditions, such as the use of wood in Japan and Vietnam, she will remain faithful; to them throughout her career. Two hundred works of plastic art are inspired by the traditions of the Land of the Rising Sun and Brazil.

The "Golden Age of English Painting" at the Luxembourg Museum in Paris

From September 11 to February 16, 2020, The Luxembourg Museum presents this year an exhibition of masters of English painting. Starting with pioneers such as Reynolds and Gainsborough, the exhibition moves further in the footsteps of their followers or competitors such as John Hopper, William Beachy and Thomas Lawrence. A special place is given to picturesque views, as well as the theme of family, kinship and childhood. Finally, visitors to this exhibition will be able to admire wildlife, see political figures of the time and the figurative narrative presented in the works of George Stubbs, George Morland, Henry Fuseli and John Martin.

"Unexpected Dialogues: Tyson/Monet" at the Marmottan Monet Museum

From October 22, 2019 to March 1, 2020. Once every six months, the Marmottan-Monet Museum invites contemporary artists to engage in dialogue with the works of the museum’s permanent collection. This time, the inventor of the so-called “Artmashina” was invited as part of an interactive retrospective between Claude Monet, who was in love with the world, and fascinated by science Keith Tyson. The latter consistently studies two works of the great master: “The Bridge of Europe” and “Station Saint-Lazare” – two ways to interpret time, space and light. If Keith Tyson has an obsession, then this is the idea of ​​light and the transmission with its help of a temporary dimension in the artist’s works. Both artists are equally passionate about science and the special technique of painting, thereby expressing their attitude to the world. Do not miss the great opportunity to meet an artist, who paints pictures using the algorithm.

"Barbara Hepworth" at the Rodin Museum

From November 5, 2019 to March 22, 2020. Barbara Hepworth, little-known in France, made revolutionary changes in British sculpture of the twentieth century and gained recognition among male colleagues, in particular, Mondrian and Picasso. She transformed prosaic matter into organic poetry, following forms or playing with volumes. She was inspired primarily by nature, but all her work bore the undoubted imprint of the events of the Second World War. However, she managed to move away from everything pathetic and dark. Hepworth’s works will primarily be appreciated by lovers of peace. That is her style.